The Shelby American Collection is fortunate enough to display some of the most famous Shelby American cars ever built. This is made possible through the generosity of many Shelby owners and collectors. Many of the cars in the collection are still raced and shown in concours around the world. The cars that are shown on these pages represent a partial list of the total collection. And we will be adding more cars and more historical details over time.

1964 FIA Cobra Roadster CSX2345

“The World Championship Roadster” Cracked paint? Dents? Scratches? It’s history, and it’s a priceless, proud and original world champion. One of the most desirable of all Cobras, CSX2345 was one of five 289 “FIA” roadsters. The museum’s most original competition car has survived unscathed for 50 years, just as it was when Bob Bondurant booted…

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1964 USRRC Cobra Roadster CSX2431

“The Ken Miles Car” Talented mechanic and standout driver Ken Miles was born in Britain. He raced motorcycles and cars in his home country, but is best known for his career with American racing teams – in 1953, he won 14 straight SCCA victories shortly after he moved to the U.S. Commonly known as the…

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1963 Cobra Le Mans CSX2137

“First FIA Win Cobra” This 1963 Factory Team Cobra Le Mans Roadster was the first Cobra to “draw blood” in the famous Cobra-Ferrari Wars of the 1960s. Three Factory Team cars were built specifically for the 24 Hours of Le Mans race in France. Designated “Cobra Le Mans,” these three cars had more than 40…

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1967 427 Cobra CSX3269

Tom Benjamin’s 427 Roadster “Coming Full Circle” Once you drive a 427 Cobra, you’ll never forget it. And once you sell one, you’ll always regret it. That’s the case here, as this one is back in the hands of its original owner. Besides the 31 early 427 S/C models and 19 competition cars, 260 427…

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1964 289 Slalom Snake Cobra Roadster CSX2537

“The Slalom Snake” The Slalom Snake (or Slalom Special, as it was first known) was marketed by Shelby American as a street Cobra fitted with the appropriate options for autocrossing. At least two such cars were built in late 1964, placing them among the last 100 289 roadsters. Since the introduction of the more powerful,…

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1964 USRRC Cobra Roadster CSX2385

“The Mack Yates Cobra” Among the experienced Corvette racers seduced by the Cobra in 1963 was Mack Yates. This Kirkwood, Mo., car dealer had done well with his Corvette that year, winning SCCA’s Midwest Division A Production Championship. In 1964, having seen the immense advantage that the Cobra held in the class, he won that…

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1964 Willment Daytona Coupe CSX2131

“The British Version” The racing community is tightly-knit, especially in England, so in late 1963, Ford dealer John Willment – then running Ford-engined Formula 1 cars for driver Frank Gardner and racing Cobra CSX2131 – heard that Shelby planned to build a series of Cobra coupes. Since he had co-driven this hardtop roadster to a…

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1957 A.C. Ace-Bristol Racer BEX254

“Cobra Roots” The Collection recognizes the Cobra’s British roots by displaying this A.C. Ace, the antecedent of the Cobra. This seductive shape started it all. Auto Carriers began in 1902, when John Weller, supported by London merchant John Portwine, started building three-wheeled delivery vehicles. Cyclecars and passenger cars followed, their designs influenced by Napier and…

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1967 Ford GT40 Mk IV J-7

“The Andretti Car” After Le Mans in 1966, Ford realized that the Mk II was reaching the end of its competitive life. It was heavy, and its aerodynamics were compromised. The decision was made to return to Le Mans with an all-new car incorporating the latest technology, with almost no regard to cost. To win…

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1965 Shelby Mustang GT350

One of the first “pony cars” – fast and sporty (and with lots of horsepower under the hood) – was of course the iconic Ford Mustang. Introduced in mid-1964, it quickly became a best-seller. Only problem, it was considered a bit small, and lacking the full-throated power that buyers wanted. Ford’s Lee Iacocca felt that…

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